Academic Courses

The WGGP Fall 2017 Course List includes only graduate courses that satisfy the requirements for the GRID minor.

Complete list of all Elective Courses for WGGP GRID Minor (click for pdf link)

Complete list of WGGP GRID Minor Electives for Fall 2017 (click for pdf link)

WOMEN AND GENDER IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Gender Relations in International Development Graduate Minor (GRID) Course List, Fall 2017

This Course List, compiled by the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program (WGGP), includes GRID Core and Elective Courses that are approved for the graduate minor, Gender Relations in International Development (GRID), administered by WGGP in conjunction with the School of Social Work. The interdisciplinary GRID minor has been cooperatively developed by a number of sponsoring academic units for students who are interested in scholarship and employment in such areas as public policy analysis and planning, international agriculture, international business, comparative education, comparative social science and human resource development in an international context.

For the GRID minor, students must, in addition to fulfilling the degree requirements of their major department, take:

  1. GRID Core Seminar (WGGP 581/SocW 581/GWS 512 offered every Spring).
  2. Two more additional units of course work from a broad list of: GRID Elective Courses (Only courses offered in Fall 2017 are listed below. For a complete list contact the WGGP Program.)

Core Course for the GRID Graduate Minor (Offered every Spring)

** NOT OFFERED THIS SEMESTER (FALL 2017)

Students in this course acquire the theoretical and empirical skills required for understanding, evaluating, and critiquing development programs and policies.  The core focus is on the gendered dimensions of such programs and policies.  Theoretical skills are acquired through comparative analyses of competing models of development such as the capability approach, dependency theory, and neo-liberal theory.  Empirical skills are built by critically evaluating national and international programs and policies related to education, health, nutrition, and agriculture as well as access to economic resources and the means of production.  This course satisfies the core requirement for the GRID graduate minor offered by the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives (WGGP) program and Human and Community Development in cooperation with departments and units across campus; for more information, check the WGGP webpage. Related seminars and other programs are offered by WGGP and cosponsors; students are encouraged to attend these and other related events.

Fall 2017 Elective Courses approved for the GRID Graduate Minor

ACE 411: Environment and Development
(Baylies, K) TR 11am-12:20pm 166 Bevier Hall
Relationship between economic development and environmental sustainability through application of cost-benefit analysis and environmental economics. Developing and developed country issues are considered with an emphasis on hands-on applications of project appraisal, social benefit-cost analysis, green accounting, and non-market valuation. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ECON 302 or equivalent.

ARCH 424/GWS 424: Gender and Race in Contemporary Architecture
(Anthony, K) TR 11:00am-12:20pm 102A Architecture Bldg
Analyzes how the built environment reflects social attitudes towards gender and race. Identifies the work of women and people of color in architecture and related disciplines as consumers, critics, and creators of the environment. Provides links with valuable professional networks in Chicago and elsewhere. Same as GWS 424. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ECON 450: Development Economics
(Akresh, R) MW 9:30am-10:50am 111 David Kinley Hall
Analyzes the economic problems associated with newly developing nations; emphasizes their economic structures, their factor scarcities, and their programs for development. Not open for graduate credit to graduate candidates in economics. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Graduate credit is not given for both ECON 450 and ECON 550 or ECON 551. Prerequisite: ECON 102 and ECON 103 or equivalent. ECON 302 strongly recommended.

ECON/ACE 452: The Latin American Economies (de Melo Caldas, R) TR 2:00pm-3:20pm 106 David Kinley Hall
RESTRICTED TO ECON-LAS MAJORS. Focuses on the economic history of the region, the recent industrialization process and its impact, the role of the state and foreign capital, the impact of the recent privatization processes, inflation and stabilization policies, and issues surrounding the distribution of income. Same as ACE 452. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: ECON 102 or ECON 103. ECON 302 or ECON 303 strongly recommended.

ECON 551: Topics in Development Economics (Akresh, R) MW 12:30-1:50pm 223 David Kinley Hall
Analyzes the newly developing economies, with emphasis on institutional factors affecting development and economic policy relating to development. Prerequisite: ECON 535 or equivalent.

EPS 421: Racial and Ethnic Families (Barnett, B) T 1:00-2:50pm 323 Education Building
Graduate- level sociological examination of how gender, race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and class function in the development of diverse American families, which are important foundations of education. Primary attention will be given to African American and Hispanic families. Secondary attention will be given to Asian American, Native American and other racial and ethnic family groups. Same as AFRO 421, HDFS 424, and SOC 421. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100, a 200-level SOC course, or consent of instructor.

EPS 530 A: Education and Globalization (McCarthy, C) T 7:00-9:00pm N/A Course meets August 28-October 20, 2017 Analyses of the role and functions of education in social, political, and economic development, with particular reference to the new and the developing countries. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

EPS 590 B: Climate Justice and Human Rights Education (Dhillon, P) T 1:00-3:50pm 389 Education Building

GWS 550: Feminist Theories & Methods (Barnes, T) M 9:00am-11:50am 102 1205 W. Nevada
Interdisciplinary study in diverse feminist theories and methods produced in and across various disciplines. Contemporary philosophical and theoretical developments in the study of gender to specific histories of class, race, ethnicity, nation and sexuality. Prerequisite: At least one graduate-level humanities course or consent of instructor.

GEOG 496: Climate & Social Vulnerability (Ribot, J) W 2:00-4:50pm 137D Davenport Hall
Existing climate variability and likely climate change call for policies to protect vulnerable people who make their livelihoods in a changing environment. Students will explore: 1) causes of climate related stress and disaster; 2) theories of vulnerability and adaptation; 3) practices and policies designed to reduce economic loss, hunger, famine and dislocation in the face of climate trends and events. Focus on multiple policy scales affecting poor and marginal populations, who are disproportionately vulnerable when facing climate stress, drawing on case examples primarily from the developing world. Same as ATMS 446 and SOC 451. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: GEOG 410, GEOG 466, GEOG 471, GEOG 520, or consent of instructor.

GEOG 587: Qualitative Research Methods (Birkenholtz, T) W 9:00am-11:50am 137D Davenport Hall
Students use individual research to practice qualitative methods of studying social interaction. Includes field research and historical/archival research methods; project areas include community development, environment, and landscape. Discussion is divided between 1) readings on issues such as techniques and research design, social theory, ethnocentrism, and combining qualitative with quantitative research and 2) student research reports. Same as UP 587. See UP 587.

HDFS 424: Racial and Ethnic Families (Barnett, B) T 1:00-2:50pm 323 Education Building
Graduate- level sociological examination of how gender, race, ethnicity, cultural diversity and class function in the development of diverse American families, which are important foundations of education. Primary attention will be given to African American and Hispanic families. Secondary attention will be given to Asian American, Native American and other racial and ethnic family groups. Same as AFRO 421, HDFS 424, and SOC 421. 3 undergraduate hours. 2 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100, a 200-level SOC course, or consent of instructor.

LER 566: International Human Resource Management (Chen, Y) M 11:00am-1:50pm 47 Inst Labor & Industrial Rel
Human resource management issues examined from the perspective of the multinational firm. Topics include globalization and human resource strategy, management and the structure of multinational firms, dealing with intercultural differences, selecting employees for foreign assignments, training and developing expatriate employees, evaluation and compensation of employees in international assignments. Individual and group projects. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

LER 595: Managing Diversity Globally (Kramer, A) R 8:00am-10:50am 386 Armory
In a global economy workplace diversity is not a trend; it is a reality faced by corporate leaders, human resource professionals and management consultants. Within the US, immigration, migration, and gender and racial differences have been major trends shaping workplace composition. Globalization places additional pressures on managing workplace diversity effectively. In this setting, training managers and human resource professionals to manage differences and adapt to multiple national and cultural contexts is an imperative. Course provides an in-depth understanding of how managers and HR professionals can be effective in not only managing diversity in a global context, but also in leveraging global diversity as a competitive advantage. By the end of this course students will have a holistic appreciation of the tools necessary to implement effective diversity management practices for a globally inclusive workplace. Restricted to Human Res & Industrial Rels major(s)

MDIA 590 MGE: Media, Gender, Ethnicity (Valdivia, A) W 6:00-8:50pm N/A

UP 423: Community Development in the Global South (Miraftab, F) TR 11:00am-12:20pm 223 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall
Introduces students to the main theoretical frameworks and conceptual building blocks of urban and community development in the Global South. It helps students to develop critical grassroots focused understanding of the approaches to development planning, the notion of community participation and empowerment, and the role of various actors including the non-government organizations and the community-based groups. 4 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours.